Speaker

Dialogue

 

Beginning of video

 

Human + machine

 

Damon Williams

Global Asset Chief Executive Officer

Management Toronto, Canada

Damon Williams

I think we have a deep belief in this organization that the combination of human plus machine is superior to human alone or machine alone. And therefore, what we're trying to do is have smart people follow sound investment processes and amplify their talents with the best tools available, which are constantly changing, and reinvest in those tools to continue to give our investment teams the best edge possible in an incredibly and increasingly competitive market.

 

Dagmara Fijalkowski

Global Asset Senior Vice President & Senior Portfolio Manager,

Management Head of Global Fixed Income and Currencies

Toronto, Canada

Dagmara Fijalkowski

The reason we started looking at different systems that could help us manage money is that we really want to identify all sources of risk in the portfolio. There is this maxim that I’ve learned a long time ago in business school: “what gets measured gets managed.” And I truly believe in it. So, we never want to be taken by surprise by performance of our fund. And you’re taken by surprise if you didn't identify all the risk.

 

Habib Subjally

Global Asset Senior Portfolio Manager and Head, Global Equities

Management London, U.K.

Habib Subjally

A lot of the things that were considered judgements in the past no longer have to be judgements, now we have the data, we have the science, we know what is the right course of action. Human beings have selectively poor memories, as my wife keeps telling me, but machines remember. So, for example, every single judgement we have made on a stock for the last 10 and a half years is recorded in a database. So we can then go back to that database and see what decisions worked, which ones didn’t.

 

Bill Tilford

Global Asset Head of Quantitative Investments

Management Toronto, Canada

Bill Tilford

There’s an engineering concept called the signal-to-noise ratio. And the more and more data that we get in society today, the more and more noise we quite frankly have in that information. So, more information is good. How you process it and the competitive advantage of how you determine what is a good signal and what is noise, is also a competitive advantage, so, that’s the nuance I would say.

 

Judy Cotte

Global Asset Vice president & Head, Corporate Governance and

Management Responsible Investment

Toronto, Canada

Judy Cotte

And in the responsible investment space in particular, environmental, social and governance factors, I think are by their very nature longer term, and really do require nuanced judgement, to understand and assess, and I think that’s something that active managers can do particularly well.

 

Eric Lascelles

Global Asset Chief Economist

Management Toronto, Canada

Eric Lascelles

We help other people manage money and we also communicate those thoughts to clients and so, in terms of how we help portfolio managers it really comes down to often setting a baseline of knowledge of what’s happening out there in the world, in the bigger picture, be it the global growth trend or the central bank story or other fundamentals like that, and often that won’t be their central investing strategy but it’s something that’s useful to know as a backdrop for those decisions.

 

Stu Kedwell

Global Asset Senior Vice President & Senior Portfolio

Management Manager, Co-Head, North American Equities

Toronto, Canada

Stu Kedwell

It’s not just the global presence, but it’s the commitment to all the tools that a global asset manager needs to perform. Whether or not it’s a quantitative model being at the top end of the game, a fundamental analysis and the commitment to that around the world, technical analysis, you name the tool as an asset manager and we have a good deep bench of those tools available to us.

Bill Tilford

That synergy of man and machine is critical I think to the future.

 

RBC Global

Asset Management

 

End of video